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Galapagos

last day of charles darwin's visit to galapagos

Commemorating the Last Day of Charles Darwin’s Visit to Galapagos

By | Galapagos, History

October 20th, 1835 –

The HMS Beagle has now concluded the end of its Galapagos Islands survey. This is the last day of Charles Darwin’s visit to Galapagos. By this point, Captain Fitzroy, his Officers, and Crew have prepared the vessel for the extra long 3,200-mile (5,150 kilometer) crossing of the Pacific Ocean. Next Destination: Society Islands (Tahiti). Read More

whalers in galapagos

Whalers in Galapagos: The First Era of Economic Activity in the Archipelago

By | Animals, Galapagos, History

Whalers in Galapagos – Before oil (petroleum) was discovered, the World was a much darker place. Lights were dim, industries were just being born, machinery was very basic, and combustion of various contraptions relied on whale oil. Consequently, any economic endeavor that was worth investing in was, almost always, related to maritime activities. Read More

Darwin in Galapagos

Charles Darwin in Galapagos: The HMS Beagle leaves the Port of Callao, Bound for the Enchantes Isles

By | Galapagos, History

The voyage of the HMS Beagle is now around four years old. Charles Darwin has jumped to the official position of on board Naturalist, after Robert McCormick quit the position back in Rio de Janeiro. It is now September 7th, 1835 and, just about a month ago, Darwin writes to his sister Catherine: “I am very anxious to see the Galapagos Islands – I think both the Geology and Zoology will not fail in being very interesting.”
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Why we don't visit some islands of the Galapagos. Photography: Francisco “Pancho” Dousdebés, Galapagos Expert

Why we don’t visit some islands of the Galapagos

By | Galapagos

The Galapagos archipelago is a big place. However, within its 133,000 km2, distributed among 20 islands and islets, only 3% is inhabited and 3% is open to tourism. But don’t fret! This doesn’t mean any less of a Galapagos experience! In fact, some of the best Galapagos adventures follow well-thought out, hand-picked itineraries. These usually include some of the archipelago’s best visitor sites and most iconic Big15 species while allowing guests to feel as if they are the first to step foot on the islands.
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White-sand beach

Galapagos Beaches: Eye Candy for the Colour Hungry  

By | Galapagos

The Galapagos Islands are around 12 to 15 million years old. A relatively young age in a geological sense. Throughout these millions of years, flora and fauna found a way to thrive in this otherwise harsh environment. Even though 15 million years is considered “young” in geological terms, it was certainly enough time for the islands to shape themselves into what they are today – one of the most pristine, unchanged and unaffected natural environments in the world. Behaviours evolved, vegetation found a niche and beaches took their sweet time in becoming a part of the landscape.
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La Pinta Darwin Day celebrations included lectures about Darwin's life and evolutionary theory.

Famous People That Have Visited Galapagos

By | Galapagos, History

The Galapagos Islands tend to procure images of a whole new world, replete with foreign life that counters our common understanding of organisms and their behavior in the wild. Surreal and freshly-made volcanic landscapes serve as the canvas for these species to paint over with their eccentric textures, remarkable body forms and quirky yet almost friendly behavioral patterns. Upon reading such a description, it might come as no surprise that hundreds of thousands of visitors have come to visit the islands over the past decades in hopes of believing what their imagination has conjured up. Many of these have travelled from around the world to experience it with their own set of senses, some of them as famous as the people we’ve heard about in the news, seen in movies or read about in our history and biology classes.
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frigatebirds chicks galapagos

Great and Magnificent Frigatebirds and Their Chicks: It’s All in the Family

By | Animals, Galapagos

Huge and majestic, frigatebirds in the Galapagos are often seen passively dominating the skies, hovering in the gentle carriage of a strong breeze as they survey the world below them. Their huge wings and jet-black colour often make them seem rather ominous, but these gentle giants are actually the most endearing of parents when it comes to their chicks. Given their frequency to being in the air so often, getting a chance to see these giant birds down on the ground with their tiny chicks is actually a pretty special sight to behold in the Galapagos. Read More