last day of charles darwin's visit to galapagos

Commemorating the Last Day of Charles Darwin’s Visit to Galapagos

By | Galapagos, History

October 20th, 1835 –

The HMS Beagle has now concluded the end of its Galapagos Islands survey. This is the last day of Charles Darwin’s visit to Galapagos. By this point, Captain Fitzroy, his Officers, and Crew have prepared the vessel for the extra long 3,200-mile (5,150 kilometer) crossing of the Pacific Ocean. Next Destination: Society Islands (Tahiti). Read More

whalers in galapagos

Whalers in Galapagos: The First Era of Economic Activity in the Archipelago

By | Animals, Galapagos, History

Whalers in Galapagos – Before oil (petroleum) was discovered, the World was a much darker place. Lights were dim, industries were just being born, machinery was very basic, and combustion of various contraptions relied on whale oil. Consequently, any economic endeavor that was worth investing in was, almost always, related to maritime activities. Read More

Guests celebrating Darwin's anniversary aboard Yacht La Pinta

Charles Darwin’s Commemoration Aboard Yacht La Pinta

By | News

Charles Darwin’s Commemoration aboard Yacht La Pinta was celebrated by our guests and crew on the 15th of September, 2017, but the story begins many years ago. One 15th of September, 182 years ago, a young Charles Darwin arrived to the Enchanted Islands aboard the HMS Beagle more excited than ever to witness the magic of the islands after all the stories he’d heard. It was thanks to his interest in taxidermy, geology, and natural history that Darwin found himself invited to partake in a voyage around the world alongside Captain Fitzroy and his crew. And while Charles Darwin soon enough found out that he was not at all built for voyages at sea, he remained aboard the Beagle for its extended 5-year journey (a length of time that ended up being much longer than initially planned).

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Darwin in Galapagos

Charles Darwin in Galapagos: The HMS Beagle leaves the Port of Callao, Bound for the Enchantes Isles

By | Galapagos, History

The voyage of the HMS Beagle is now around four years old. Charles Darwin has jumped to the official position of on board Naturalist, after Robert McCormick quit the position back in Rio de Janeiro. It is now September 7th, 1835 and, just about a month ago, Darwin writes to his sister Catherine: “I am very anxious to see the Galapagos Islands – I think both the Geology and Zoology will not fail in being very interesting.”
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Whales in the Galapagos. Photo credit: Francisco "Pancho" Dousdebés, Galapagos Expert

Beautiful Giants – Whales in the Galapagos

By | Animals

When Cetaceans Return to the Galapagos – Whales & Dolphins Back at Tropical Latitudes

Every journey to the archipelago comes packed with numerous and spectacular wildlife viewing opportunities. The Galapagos truly is a magical place, thanks in large part to the diverse wildlife that’s around each corner, all throughout the year! And if it’s the bigger animals that you are interested in, then read on, hop in one of the best archipelago’s expedition vessels, and get ready to be seriously impressed by some amazing whales in the Galapagos!

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Why we don't visit some islands of the Galapagos. Photography: Francisco “Pancho” Dousdebés, Galapagos Expert

Why we don’t visit some islands of the Galapagos

By | Galapagos

The Galapagos archipelago is a big place. However, within its 133,000 km2, distributed among 20 islands and islets, only 3% is inhabited and 3% is open to tourism. But don’t fret! This doesn’t mean any less of a Galapagos experience! In fact, some of the best Galapagos adventures follow well-thought out, hand-picked itineraries. These usually include some of the archipelago’s best visitor sites and most iconic Big15 species while allowing guests to feel as if they are the first to step foot on the islands.
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White-sand beach

Galapagos Beaches: Eye Candy for the Colour Hungry  

By | Galapagos

The Galapagos Islands are around 12 to 15 million years old. A relatively young age in a geological sense. Throughout these millions of years, flora and fauna found a way to thrive in this otherwise harsh environment. Even though 15 million years is considered “young” in geological terms, it was certainly enough time for the islands to shape themselves into what they are today – one of the most pristine, unchanged and unaffected natural environments in the world. Behaviours evolved, vegetation found a niche and beaches took their sweet time in becoming a part of the landscape.
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